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CEOS BANDING TOGETHER FOR GOOD

Published: Friday, March 8, 2019

Education Business WellnessCommunity AffairsDisabilityYouthWelfareWelfare Issues

CEOs are banding together to make a difference and it is certain to have a major, positive impact on workplace morale. More and more business leaders seem to be raising their hands to participate in charitable events. This humanitarian focus and drive not only aids deserving charities, but the business leaders and their staff as well.

    Press Release feature Image

    “We become leaders the day we decide to help people grow…”

    - Simon Sinek

     

    CEOs are banding together to make a difference and it is certain to have a major, positive impact on workplace morale. More and more business leaders seem to be raising their hands to participate in charitable events. This humanitarian focus and drive not only aids deserving charities, but the business leaders and their staff as well.

     

    A humanitarian focus in the workplace helps employees to feel a sense of security and belonging. It fosters a culture of openness and generosity which in turn helps employees to feel safe within their work environment. This leads to a more productive workplace, as security ensures both confidence and higher productivity.

     

    In contrast, reportedly, in companies where employees do not feel safe and secure their productivity suffers as there is not only a lack of motivation but also the crippling effect of insecurity. Employees who second-guess their work due to feeling insecure can take up to three times longer to complete a given project.

     

    CEOs and business leaders have the opportunity to display their empathy through engaging in charitable events, setting an example, and leading the way forward towards a kinder working atmosphere. Allowing their employees to be a part of that process also fosters a sense of comradery in the work team, especially in cases where employees can participate in the charitable event and/or see the positive effect that the given humanitarian project is having.

     

    One such cause that many CEOs have recently signed up for is LITTLE EDEN CEO Wheelchair Campaign. To participate, CEOs donate R50 000 (R30 000 for smaller organisations) towards the cause and have agreed to spend a day in March in a wheelchair at their place of work. The decision to use wheelchairs as the tool for this campaign stems from the fact that LITTLE EDEN Society cares for 300 residents with profound intellectual disability, which often leaves the residents wheelchair-bound. Additionally March is National Profound Intellectual Disability Month, making this perfect timing for such a campaign.

     

    The Campaign’s official launch date was 27 February and commenced with a launch event.  Among the speakers at the campaign launch were Sandra Khumalo, a South African Rower in the Paralympics, Nene Molefi, CEO of Mandate Molefi HR Consulting, Bharti Patel, National Executive Director of The South African Federation of Mental Health, as well as members from the LITTLE EDEN Team. In her keynote address, Bharti Patel stated that; “It is a privilege and an honour to be a part of something like this… It is very gratifying.”

     

    Sandra Khumalo stated that she supports LITTLE EDEN’s work and outlined her personal mission statement as: “My goal, wherever I go, is to touch people’s lives. We can help other people regardless of what has happened to us”. The residents at LITTLE EDEN “Inspire (her) everyday, they teach us that life goes on”, she continued.

     

    Nene Molefi confirmed that she asks herself every day; “I am a woman, I am a CEO, what can I do with my position to give back? I am urging all other CEOs to step up and show their support.”

     

    All CEOs interested in participating in the LITTLE EDEN CEO Wheelchair Campaign please contact Mary-Anne Wright at perfectword2[email protected].  

     

    - ENDS -

     

    Boilerplate:

     

    LITTLE EDEN is a registered non-profit organisation [001-827 NPO] and PBO [No.930/0000/03] providing life-long care to 300 children and adults with profound intellectual disability in two custom designed residential facilities – Domitilla and Danny Hyams Home in Edenvale, and Elvira Rota Village, a small holding in Bapsfontein.

     

    For more information, visit www.littleeden.org.za.

    “We become leaders the day we decide to help people grow…”

    - Simon Sinek

     

    CEOs are banding together to make a difference and it is certain to have a major, positive impact on workplace morale. More and more business leaders seem to be raising their hands to participate in charitable events. This humanitarian focus and drive not only aids deserving charities, but the business leaders and their staff as well.

    A humanitarian focus in the workplace helps employees to feel a sense of security and belonging. It fosters a culture of openness and generosity which in turn helps employees to feel safe within their work environment. This leads to a more productive workplace, as security ensures both confidence and higher productivity.

    In contrast, reportedly, in companies where employees do not feel safe and secure their productivity suffers as there is not only a lack of motivation but also the crippling effect of insecurity. Employees who second-guess their work due to feeling insecure can take up to three times longer to complete a given project.

    CEOs and business leaders have the opportunity to display their empathy through engaging in charitable events, setting an example, and leading the way forward towards a kinder working atmosphere. Allowing their employees to be a part of that process also fosters a sense of comradery in the work team, especially in cases where employees can participate in the charitable event and/or see the positive effect that the given humanitarian project is having.

    One such cause that many CEOs have recently signed up for is LITTLE EDEN CEO Wheelchair Campaign. To participate, CEOs donate R50 000 (R30 000 for smaller organisations) towards the cause and have agreed to spend a day in March in a wheelchair at their place of work. The decision to use wheelchairs as the tool for this campaign stems from the fact that LITTLE EDEN Society cares for 300 residents with profound intellectual disability, which often leaves the residents wheelchair-bound. Additionally March is National Profound Intellectual Disability Month, making this perfect timing for such a campaign.

    The Campaign’s official launch date was 27 February and commenced with a launch event.  Among the speakers at the campaign launch were Sandra Khumalo, a South African Rower in the Paralympics, Nene Molefi, CEO of Mandate Molefi HR Consulting, Bharti Patel, National Executive Director of The South African Federation of Mental Health, as well as members from the LITTLE EDEN Team. In her keynote address, Bharti Patel stated that; “It is a privilege and an honour to be a part of something like this… It is very gratifying.”

    Sandra Khumalo stated that she supports LITTLE EDEN’s work and outlined her personal mission statement as: “My goal, wherever I go, is to touch people’s lives. We can help other people regardless of what has happened to us”. The residents at LITTLE EDEN “Inspire (her) everyday, they teach us that life goes on”, she continued.

    Nene Molefi confirmed that she asks herself every day; “I am a woman, I am a CEO, what can I do with my position to give back? I am urging all other CEOs to step up and show their support.”

    All CEOs interested in participating in the LITTLE EDEN CEO Wheelchair Campaign please contact Mary-Anne Wright at [email protected].  

     

    - ENDS -

     

    Boilerplate:

    LITTLE EDEN is a registered non-profit organisation [001-827 NPO] and PBO [No.930/0000/03] providing life-long care to 300 children and adults with profound intellectual disability in two custom designed residential facilities – Domitilla and Danny Hyams Home in Edenvale, and Elvira Rota Village, a small holding in Bapsfontein.

    For more information, visit www.littleeden.org.za.